Step 3: Citizenship



Discussion questions


1. How did you do on the assessment on page 110?
2. How do the areas of awareness on page 108 impact digital citizenship decisions?
3. What are some common digital citizenship issues in collaborative projects? How should teachers handle problems when they happen?
4. Let's talk about the explicit teaching of digital citizenship
5. What process does CUSD 304 have for working collaboratively?

Optional Challenges

1. Look through the Digital Citizen lesson resources below
2. Plan an authentic ways to teach digital citizenship in your classroom

Areas of Awareness


Monitor and Be Engaged

Be familiar with each aspect of each awareness: pg. 103-104

Technology Awareness

  • Safety
  • Privacy
  • Copyright
  • Fair Use
  • Legal

Individual Awareness

  • Safety
  • Privacy
  • Copyright
  • Fair Use
  • Legal

Social Awareness

  • Safety
  • Privacy
  • Copyright
  • Fair Use
  • Legal

Cultural Awareness

  • Safety
  • Privacy
  • Copyright
  • Fair Use
  • Legal

Global Awareness

  • Safety
  • Privacy
  • Copyright
  • Fair Use
  • Legal




Via Lisa Parisi



Vicki Davis' poster for internet safety

http://coolcatteacher.blogspot.com/2009/09/5-steps-to-online-safety.html

5

Online Internet safety scavenger hunt differentiated for grade 3-8

banner_image.jpg

Wiki with 9 Elements of Digital Citizenship via Newtown Friends School

9_elements_wordle.jpg

creative_commons.jpg

http://creativecommons.org/videos/wanna-work-together

Creative Commons is a way to give credit to people who post their original work and material. People can license their work under Creative Commons. It then cannot be used by others without out permission. It allows people to share their work publicly for others to see without worrying about someone taking their work without crediting the author.



Fair Use Video

Copyright and Fair Use of Materials from:

http://us.iearn.org/professional-development/copyright
Please see the site above for additional resources


Ethical Use of Materials: how and when to cite online and print resources


IEARN project work encourages students to share information as they collaborate. This often requires research online or in school libraries. The World Wide Web has made it increasingly easy for students to share with others by copying and pasting. This information may come in the form of pictures, graphs, text, and videos. It is important to understand that all material online and in print belongs to someone. The rights of these individuals are protected under copyright laws in many countries. Once something is printed or published it is automatically copyrighted without any formal procedure. There are guidelines that help students and teachers use material with others for education purposes.

Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy

www.mediaeducationlab.com/copyright
This document is a code of best practices that helps educators using media literacy concepts and techniques to interpret the copyright doctrine of fair use. Fair use is the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment under some circumstances—especially when the cultural or social benefits of the use are predominant. It is a general right that applies even in situations where the law provides no specific authorization for the use in question—as it does for certain narrowly defined classroom activities.
This guide identifies five principles that represent the media literacy education community’s current consensus about acceptable practices for the fair use of copyrighted materials, wherever and however it occurs: in K–12 education, in higher education, in nonprofit organizations that offer programs for children and youth, and in adult education.

The Five Principals:

  • Under fair use, educators using the concepts and techniques of medialiteracy can choose illustrative material from the full range of copyrighted sources and make them available to learners, in class, in workshops, in informal mentoring and teaching settings, and on school-related Web sites.
  • Under fair use, educators using the concepts and techniques of media literacy can integrate copyrighted material into curriculum materials, including books, workbooks, podcasts, DVD compilations, videos, Web sites, and other materials designed for learning.
  • Educators using concepts and techniques of media literacy should be able to share effective examples of teaching about media and meaning with one another, including lessons and resource materials. If curriculum developers are making sound decisions on fair use when they create their materials, then their work should be able to be seen, used, and even purchased by anyone—since fair use applies to commercial materials as well as those produced outside the marketplace model.
  • Because media literacy education cannot thrive unless learners themselves have the opportunity to learn about how media functions at the most practical level, educators using concepts and techniques of media literacy should be free to enable learners to incorporate, modify, and re-present existing media objects in their own classroom work. Media production can foster and deepen awareness of the constructed nature of all media, one of the key concepts of media literacy. The basis for fair use here is embedded in good pedagogy.
  • Educators should work with learners to make a reasoned decision about distribution that reflects sound pedagogy and ethical values. In some cases, widespread distribution of students’ work (via the Internet, for example) is appropriate. If student work that incorporates, modifies, and re-presents existing media content meets the transformativeness standard, it can be distributed to wide audiences under the doctrine of fair use.

- From www.mediaeducationlab.com/code-best-practices-fair-use-media-literacy-education-0

Fair Use Guidelines

Note: These are only guidelines not law.
"Fair use is a legal principle that defines the limitations on the exclusive rights** of copyright holders. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide guidance on the application of fair use principles by educators, scholars and students who develop multimedia projects using portions of copyrighted works under fair use rather than by seeking authorization for non-commercial educational uses. These guidelines apply only to fair use in the context of copyright and to no other rights."




"Citizenship comes first today in our crowded world...No man can enjoy the privileges of education and thereafter with a clear conscience break his contract with society. To respect that contract is to be mature, to strengthen it is to be a good citizen, to do more than your share under it is noble." ~Isaiah Bowman

"No one is born a good citizen; no nation is born a democracy. Rather, both are processes that continue to evolve over a lifetime. Young people must be included from birth. A society that cuts off from its youth severs its lifeline." ~ Kofi Annan